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20121205
20121213
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oath: the obama white house and the supreme court." so what exactly does he mean? you've studied justice scalia. you have studied the law. when he talks about the reduction to the absurd. >> well, it's actually a very interesting controversy that may be changing before our very eyes, wolf. because historically one of the grounds that congress can pass a law is they say, we morally disapprove. moral disapproval is not an aprop pree grounds for a government action but over time the court has said certain kinds of moral disapproval is no longer allowed. you can't simply disapprove of blacks and whites going to school together and pass a law. the question now is, is moral disapproval of homosexuality a legitimate ground for the government doing anything? that's really one of the main issues in this case coming out. >> that's his argument, that that's why he's opposed to it? is that what you're saying? >> well, what he's saying is that the legislature, whether it's a state legislature or congress can say we morally disapprove of homosexuality, thus we will say they can't get married t
with the president, house speaker john boehner says the white house is stone walling. >> when it comes to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house is has wasted another week. >> reporter: this morning in his weekly address, president obama is holding a hard line on raising rates for the wealthy. >> and if we're serious about protecting middle-class families, then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> reporter: but how much higher could be the key. the top tax rate is set to rise from 35% to 39.6% on january 1st. when asked if a middle ground could be found, both boehner and biden showed some wiggle room. >> the top brackets have to go up. it's not a negotiable issue. theoretically we can negotiate how far up. >> reporter: at another local restaurant, the owner has seen enough of washington gridlock. >> i wish those lawmakers would get their [ bleep ] together and get it done and try to help everybody. it would be good if they could do it before the holidays are over
? the president or congress. i would make the argument that obama is clearly the one. certainly democrats are probably little bit more to blame. two years ago, democrats ran the entire town. they had a filibuster proof majority in the senate. they control the house and white house. if they wanted to cut spending at that time, they could have done so. republicans -- they could've done it over every republican objection and they could've gotten everything they wanted. they didn't do that. but i do think it's worth remembering that if you go back 10 years, president bush, and the republican-controlled congress, then acted too expensive for us that were not paid for. the thing that is worse today with obamacare, which i don't think we'll actually get paid for with these sudden efficiencies we will find in the federal government, which the federal government has never found before -- is that wars eventually end. entitlement programs like obamacare go on forever. just for those reasons, i do think democrats are far worse. all of these people have some blood on their hands. greg: you said that a
stopped looking for work. fox business network's peter barnes is live for us at the white house with the latest on this. peter? >> reporter: that's right, heather. that 7.7% for november was the lowest level since december 2008 and the lowest level of president obama's presidency, and that was down from 7.9% in october. non-farm payrolls up 146,000 in november. both of these numbers were somewhat of a surprise here, somewhat above expectations because economistses had been expecting -- economistses had been expecting that because of hurricane sandy, job creation might have been a little slower last month, the unemployment rate might have stayed a little bit higher. it turns out that sandy did have an impact, but not on the headline numbers. >> if you look deeper in the report, you do see that over a million workers who normally work full time were reduced to part-time hours during the reference week because of bad weather, and over 300,000 additional workers weren't able to work at all because of bad weather. >> reporter: and because of the way the labor department calculates or
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4